0208 530 1500 info@promoworx.co.uk

1) What’s the purpose of your website?

This is the basis for everything that is to come. So don’t rush this step by just settling for the obvious: “I want a website to share with clients.” The purpose of your website will mold the decision making process that lies ahead. Be as specific as possible and everything else will fall into place.

“I want something that is product-focused, I want something that’s easily updatable from home, and I want quirky product shots with vibrant borders around them.” This is client-gold for your design team as it means that they can combine functionality with design right from the start (which is much harder to do later down the line).

2) Content, content, content.

Once you’ve decided exactly what it is your website will be designed for, you create content. Divide your content into manageable sections and bring any ideas you have to the table.

Now the question is not ‘why’ but ‘who’? Who will be reading this content? How will they have got here? What will they be looking for? What else will be demanding their attention? For many business owners, it can be useful to use a copy or content writer for this part – either as they are too busy, writing is not their forte or they are just too close to the company to write about it succinctly. We can recommend a writer to draft content for you from scratch or simply proof-read and edit your content before it goes live.

It’s not just about the words. Visual content is essential. Photos, videos, animation, links – you name it. Read our blog about visual content.

3) Calls to action:

If your goal is to educate an audience with weekly newsletters, then a subscribe mechanism is required. If you want people to share your products or services via their own social channels, then a means of doing that needs to be relayed to your design team. We can help you think outside the box for more creative calls to action. However, even the simplest call to action will begin helping you attract traffic, likes, followers, contacts etc.

4) Explain:

Opening that email entitled ‘Website Design v1’ can be an excitingly tense moment for clients – and designers alike. We encourage our clients to use visual examples of what they like or dislike before we start work. The trouble with using words to describe what we like is that they can be interpreted very differently. What you mean by ‘clean’ might be completely different to someone else’s interpretation. The same goes for feedback. Be as specific as you possibly can. Point out which bits you like and which bits you’d like to amend and say why for both. Every explanation will result in a better understanding between you and your designer – and a better website.

But it’s not just about the words. Think about images, videos and other visually stimulating ways to represent your brand. We have a blog about visual data to help you. If you have to use ‘stock’ photography make sure you and your designer choose the images carefully. In some cases they can give a company a ‘fictitious feel’. Really? Those models in suits high-fiving near a window overlooking the New York skyline? That’s your high street office?

5) Have a two-way conversation:

You are the client and the aim is, of course, to give you a website that will win business and is exactly what you want. It’s a good idea to consider any points made by your designer. They have a vested interest in creating something which looks impressive and works for you. Because this will make you happy – and a happy client recommends their web designer to others. And also because your website will be part of their portfolio of work. They’re also likely to be speaking from experience. So you don’t have to agree with everything they suggest but it really is a good idea to at least listen.

6) Keep the conversation going:

Your website is the digital extension of you and your brand. It’s important to get it right and your designer will need your feedback at every step. The initial meeting is an exciting time when everyone is full of energy and enthusiasm. If you’re swift and efficient with answering queries or supplying content (see above), and are eager to see the final result, then that energy can be maintained throughout the entire process. It will be a project everyone wants to be part of and that will come through in the final site.

At Promoworx, we are proud to have amazing relationships with clients who have not only used us for multiple websites, design and print but who have recommended us to others. For experienced advice and a friendly chat call us on 0208 530 1500 or email info@promoworx.co.uk

Other relative blogs:

7 signs your site really needs updating
Why we like video